Search
  • Homebodies

How to Ensure your Nanny Feels Appreciated

At Homebodies we help all kinds of families hire fantastic nannies. The successful introduction and placement is however only the starting point. Like any other relationship, building a positive, ongoing association with a nanny requires empathy, consideration and effort.


The majority of parents expect a long-term arrangement to ensure consistency for their child or growing family: Equally we understand that hard-working, career nannies stay for greater periods of time in roles where they feel valued. Knowing how to show appreciation therefore is essential for nanny employers keen to ensure the relationship has longevity.


Nannies have shared some of the wonderful -and unexpected -ways their employers have made them feel appreciated.


A daily nanny currently working in Kensington told us that while monetary bonuses had, in many of her roles, been given at the end of each year (and gratefully received), it was actually the small, thoughtful gestures that meant the most. “I returned from a really rainy, blustery walk a few days ago. I immediately hurried to prepare lunch for my charge and got on with the day. It was only later that I realised my boss (who is currently working from home) had hung my wet coat in the airing cupboard to ensure it was dry for my walk home at the end of the day”.


“I’m always impressed when parents respect our working hours.” Explained a live-in nanny working in Pimlico. It might not seem a big deal for a parent to take over five or ten minutes after a nanny’s scheduled finish time, but respecting start and finish times shows that an employer values their nanny’s time and understands that s/he has a right to a life outside of work. The nanny went on to highlight the fact that “We can all make more money but not more time!”


Many nannies we spoke with stressed the importance of contractual matters being dealt with in a calm, professional manner. Working in a domestic environment shouldn’t mean that informality and presumption characterises discussions relating to pay, annual leave or working hours. If an employer’s tone or approach wouldn’t be used for interactions with a colleague, then it’s very unlikely to make a nanny feel valued. Equally, employers who understand that nannies are only human and will occasionally need time off due to illness, compassionate or family reasons will reassure a nanny that s/he is held in high esteem.


Parents tend to hire nannies who have solid previous experience with children of similar ages to their own - if this is the case in your family, be prepared to at least listen to and try out to the advice the nanny has to offer. Their guidance is often the culmination of years of experience with a variety of children and family situations. “Treating me as an equal, valuing my input and listening to my advice are things that mean so much” a mature nanny from Clapham related.


An early-rising, daily nanny working south of the river told us “I start at 6:45am each day and it’s so lovely that a cup of tea is ready and waiting for me as soon as I arrive. So kind and thoughtful of my bosses!


The grand gestures of some affluent families (for example large cash bonuses, new cars, designer handbags and deluxe beauty gifts) are not always the most valued. Well thought out small gifts or random acts of kindness actually meant so much to the nannies we spoke to. These ranged from being included in family takeaway night, given thoughtful token gifts on religious or cultural holidays, the surprise of being able to leave at lunchtime after a particularly challenging week and being handed a bottle of wine, favourite chocolates or voucher for coffee ‘just because’.


Are you still curious as to the most popular response from nannies when asked them what makes them feel appreciated?...


It’s beautifully simple...


“Thank you”


Simply making a point of saying thank you to your nanny at the end of each day shows you value the contribution and effort they are making to help your family thrive.


The little things really are the big things!

At Homebodies we help all kinds of families hire fantastic nannies. The successful introduction and placement is however only the starting point. Like any other relationship, building a positive, ongoing association with a nanny requires empathy, consideration and effort.


The majority of parents expect a long-term arrangement to ensure consistency for their child or growing family: Equally we understand that hard-working, career nannies stay for greater periods of time in roles where they feel valued. Knowing how to show appreciation therefore is essential for nanny employers keen to ensure the relationship has longevity.


Nannies have shared some of the wonderful -and unexpected -ways their employers have made them feel appreciated.


A daily nanny currently working in Kensington told us that while monetary bonuses had, in many of her roles, been given at the end of each year (and gratefully received), it was actually the small, thoughtful gestures that meant the most.

“I returned from a really rainy, blustery walk a few days ago. I immediately hurried to prepare lunch for my charge and got on with the day. It was only later that I realised my boss (who is currently working from home) had hung my wet coat in the airing cupboard to ensure it was dry for my walk home at the end of the day”.


“I’m always impressed when parents respect our working hours.” Explained a live-in nanny working in Pimlico. It might not seem a big deal for a parent to

take over five or ten minutes after a nanny’s scheduled finish time, but respecting start and finish times shows that an employer values their nanny’s time and understands that s/he has a right to a life outside of work. The nanny went on to highlight the fact that “We can all make more money but not more time!”


Many nannies we spoke with stressed the importance of contractual matters being dealt with in a calm, professional manner.

Working in a domestic environment shouldn’t mean that informality and presumption characterises discussions relating to pay, annual leave or working hours. If an employer’s tone or approach wouldn’t be used for interactions with a colleague, then it’s very unlikely to make a nanny feel valued. Equally, employers who understand that nannies are only human and will occasionally need time off due to illness, compassionate or family reasons will reassure a nanny that s/he is held in high esteem.


Parents tend to hire nannies who have solid previous experience with children of similar ages to their own - if this is the case in your family, be prepared to at least listen to and try out to the advice the nanny has to offer. Their guidance is often the culmination of years of experience with a variety of children and family situations.

“Treating me as an equal, valuing my input and listening to my advice are things that mean so much” a mature nanny from Clapham related.


An early-rising, daily nanny working south of the river told us “I start at 6:45am each day and it’s so lovely that a cup of tea is ready and waiting for me as soon as I arrive. So kind and thoughtful of my bosses!


The grand gestures of some affluent families (for example large cash bonuses, new cars, designer handbags and deluxe beauty gifts) are not always the most valued. Well thought out small gifts or random acts of kindness actually meant so much to the nannies we spoke to. These ranged from being included in family takeaway night, given thoughtful token gifts on religious or cultural holidays, the surprise of being able to leave at lunchtime after a particularly challenging week and being handed a bottle of wine, favourite chocolates or voucher for coffee ‘just because’.


Are you still curious as to the most popular response from nannies when asked them what makes them feel appreciated?...


It’s beautifully simple...


“Thank you”


Simply making a point of saying thank you to your nanny at the end of each day shows you value the contribution and effort they are making to help your family thrive.


The little things really are the big things!


29 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All